Monday, December 16, 2019

1Password: Use a different password every time; don’t remember them

Keeping track of a multitude of passwords is an impossible task. That’s why many people choose a few easily remembered words or phrases and use them over and over again. But what if you could have a different, very secure password for every site you visit without the need ever to remember them?

Ming Thein on the evolution of street photography

Words of wisdom from Ming: It is worth remembering that an image reflects the photographer as much as it is about the subject....

Leica M3: Film photography and a plate of Kaiserschmarrn

Film photography has now cult status among young whipper-snappers. Mike found a 60-year-old M3 outfit in 20-something hands while enjoying a plate of Kaiserschmarrn at the Gendarmenmarkt Christmas market

Saving the world with the TRS-80

280px-Trs80_2 Thirty years ago today MacOldie Corporation acquired its very first computer. The Tandy (Radio Shack) TRS80 had 8KB of RAM and a cassette input device. Hopes were cherished that this rather neat little box would handle all the MacOldie Corp. accounts, compose and print letters and reports and even make the tea. 

Such hopes were very soon dashed, not surprisingly with 20:20 hindsight, and the little computer proved utterly useless for business purposes, although it was well regarded by the hobbyist and still has a strong following. It languished in the cupboard and an electronic single-line display typewriter was purchased from Olivetti. This had a fiendlishly difficult method of viewing and correcting documents and proved to be short lived.

Then along came the Superbrain, a one-piece terminal-style unit in a cowl that would not have been out of place on the Starship Enterprise. This, with it's twin 5.25in floppy disks and a tad more memory, proved an altogether more useful asset. The introduction to Superbrain came from a small north-London company peddling accounting software and MacOldie, who always had a penchant for mechanisation of the bean counting, soon had a reliable and serviceable business system. Letters and reports were rattled off on WordStar and clients began receiving personally-addressed mail-merged letters, the wonder of the age.

Pretty soon MacOldie got to worrying about data security (as he was to do on and off for the next thirty years) and a decision was made to acquire a hard disk. This came in a substantial metal enclosure and stored a massive five megabytes of data. It cost a fortune and, today, it would just about hold one medium-size photo from Aunt Flora MacOldie's digital camera.

Intl206t No looking back from then for an increasingly digitised MacOldie. Soon the Superbrains were replaced with Apricots, still running the CPM operating system, then came the first Dells with MSDOS. WordStar, the early-80's word processor of choice was ditched in favour of Microsoft Word, pre Windows of course. Windows provided a real breakthrough in useability and served MacOldie Enterprises well for many a year.

So it was a very experienced Windows user who finally converted to Macdom in 2005, 25 years after the first byte was bitten. The speed of development has continued to accelerate throughout the past 30 years of the personal computer and these days we take a massive leap forward every year, particularly in terms of memory and storage. In those early days 5MB was an inconceivably large amount of spare disk; now we are on the verge of ditching the gigabyte in favour of the terabyte and the fabled petabyte is on the horizon. Of course, everything we use--operating systems, programs, data--get bigger in line with the increased memory and storage so we are still sometimes scrambling for RAM or disk storage. 

Sir Francis Ronalds: The true father of modern communications

My great-great-great uncle, Sir Francis Ronalds FRS (1788-1873), was a scientist and inventor whose achievements span the disciplines of electricity, meteorology, photography, mechanics, optics and more. He can be argued to be the first electrical engineer.

Return: After 11 years photographing Iraq and Afghanistan, Tom comes home

I've never met Tom Stanworth, although we have exchanged the odd email over the years. Tom is a remarkable man, a photographer who has spent the past decade working in two of the world's most troubled countries and experienced the sort of drama that few of us can even imagine. He is now packing and will return to a less exciting life in the North West of England.

Lost Bugatti meets the 24-litre Napier-Railton at Brooklands

Last weekend I was fortunate to see the massive "Lost Bugatti" on display for a short time at Brooklands Museum alongside the equally impressive 24-litre Napier-Railton — a permanent exhibit at the famous race track and museum.

Fuji X20: Blast from the past takes on Kyoto in the rain

We arrived in historic heritage Kyoto in drizzling rain, and the weather stayed that way while we were there. So, what to do? The little backup Fuji X20 came to the rescue.....

Leica D-Lux 7: Problems processing RWL files – monochrome output

It looks like Lightroom currently doesn’t like the new Leica D-Lux 7, despite its Panasonic sibling having been on the market for several months. RWL files are currently processing in monochrome, so beware.

In a Pickle: Developing a taste for photography in south London

Opposite the house where Charlie Chaplin once lived is the pickle factory where Chaplin Senior laboured to support his family. And that...