Home L-Mount Sigma fp is already a best seller in Japan

Sigma fp is already a best seller in Japan

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Some mount! Sigma couldn't have made this camera any taller because it is already barely larger than the mount. And overall, it is a hand-sized mirrorless wonder

Sigma’s quirky new fp, said to be the world’s smallest full-frame digital camera, seems to be taking the Japanese home market by storm. Despite arriving on the shelves only on October 25, it outsold all other cameras in October and is powering ahead in November.

Apparently advance orders had been modest, but positive reviews and the experience of actually holding the camera seems to have unleashed a rush to buy. Against a backdrop of the declining fortunes of the camera industry, it’s encouraging that something so unusual has captured the imagination.

The fp kit, including the 45mm f/2.8 Contemporary lens is proving a major hit in Japan. This small but well-crafted and sold lens was clearly designed with the fp in mind.
The fp kit, including the 45mm f/2.8 Contemporary lens, is proving a major hit in Japan. This small but well-crafted and sold lens was clearly designed with the fp in mind.

A report in Digital Camera Review shows the fp kit (bundled with the 45mm f/2.8 DG DN) was the best seller during the second half of October at major retailer Yodobashi, ahead of a trio of Sonys and the Canon EOS 90D.

The body, without the lens, was the tenth-best seller which gives a good indication that the kit is the most popular choice, at least in Japan. Over at MapCamera, the Sigma fp headed the sales list overall for the month of October.

L-Mount future

From the vantage point of an L-Mount convert, Sigma’s success bodes well for the future of the system. With the backing of the Leica name and reputation, the alliance has had a successful year. Sigma, in particular, has sailed into view in a most remarkable way. The professional-quality Art lenses are serious tools at an attractive price and the new camera seems to be overcoming its quirkiness.

Some mount! Sigma couldn’t have made this camera any taller because it is already barely larger than the mount. And overall, it is a hand-sized mirrorless wonder and is reminiscent of Panasonic’s GM1 micro four-thirds baby

Many of us will be looking at this camera primarily because of its extremely small size. Together with that really rather special f/2.8 45mm, it makes for a very compact and light entry into the full-frame world. It lacks a viewfinder, which is perhaps its biggest stumbling block in the stills market. But it is aimed primarily at videographers. Yet it is likely to gain fans among stills photographers and some are already getting worked up. Steve Huff, for instance, has rushed out and bought camera, lens and that rather unusual accessory viewfinder. Steve’s enthusiasm for the camera is in full flow and this, alone, will hardly harm Sigma’s prospects. Steve is a world-class enthuser, as we all know.

The L-Mount Alliance, after open ten months of product available (other than the Leica SL, of course) seems on course for success. We now have four excellent cameras — SL2, S1, S1R, S1H and Sigma fp — and upwards of 45 lenses. All cover a wide range of prices and all offer good build quality and great performance.

It will be interesting to see how things go with the Alliance over the next twelve months. Unlike other sectors of the market, the Alliance is fully focused on one project and offers the sort of choice and interchangeability that only micro four-thirds has managed to deliver in the past.


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11 COMMENTS

  1. Steve Huff has an early review on his website that looks at the FP mainly for stills. And the results look very good indeed, especially for colour tones. Surely they need to build a real evf accessory for it though? The loupe setup for the rear screen just looks cumbersome for a stills photographer.

  2. Mike, perhaps that weird device on the back of Steve Huff’s fp is not a viewfinder for the camera but a lens for looking into the spirit world. See huffparanormal.com for some seriously wacky stuff.

    • Thank you John. Just accessed ‘huff paranormal.com’. Wacky indeed! I will not be accessing any of SH’s camera/lens reviews in future. Mike please feel free to delete my reply if it offends.

      • No, I’m not deleting it. It’s not a secret and I imagine Steve doesn’t think it has any bearing on his photographic activities. Others would disagree, but it’s a free world.

        John and I had a look at this site some months ago. I’d completely forgotten about it.

        We all have our quirks. Take a look at our sister site

        macflatearth.org

          • You mean flat earth? Well, it’s obvious, isn’t it. We even sell a gold-plated spirit level designed by Leica Optical and sponsored by the famous rock star Lummy Crevice. You place it on a flat surface and is proves without a doubt that the earth must be flat. Only £5,850 or €6,500 to you, William.

  3. Thank you John. Just accessed ‘huff paranormal.com’. Wacky indeed! I will not be accessing any of SH’s camera/lens reviews in future. Mike please feel free to delete my reply if it offends.

  4. I did read Steve Huff – but it was not that that persuaded me to buy the Fp: rather a combination of its qualities and its extraordinary travel friendliness. I’m in Saint Pressburg right now with it and it’s 45/2.8 lens ( which I have been using on my SL) and I must say I’m really impressed. Before leaving I did try it on a number of M and TL lenses and the results were comparable (I’m not a scientist) to those I got on the SL.
    So into my back pack it went. I have thirty days to review, keep or return. So far it’s a keeper; I’ll follow up with news from here and Moscow next week. The lack of a viewfinder is for me not a problem as I have become quite used to the TL2 without its klunky top piece and of course my iPhone which is in daily use. The Fp is like a fat little full frame iPhone on steroids!

    • I’ll look forward to your real world report, Tony! For me, the lack of viewfinder will be a problem, because unless i’m shooting on a tripod i find using LCD’s awkward and less than stable. But i’ve been impressed with the sample images i’ve seen, and there doesnt seem to be any obvious problems with the electronic shutter under artificial lights so it must be a fairly quick readout speed from the sensor.

      This camera and the 45/2.8 combo does tempt me. Especially if Huffs colour tones are indicative of the camera output.

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